Tag Archives: max mose

24 must be my lucky number!

10 Oct

‘Cause today I (a) turned 24 and (b) got a bunch of great news! If you’ll allow me some birthday narcissism, let me tell you all about it!

First of all, the Minneapolis Indie Xpo (or MIX, as we affectionately call it) announced its programming schedule! I’m going to be part of Salon Saloon: The Comic Show, and I was totally psyched to find out that my co-panelists are Danno Klonowski, Corinne Mucha, and John Porcellino! MIX will take place on November 5-6 this year, and my panel is at 3:30 on the 5th. I’ll also be hanging out at the CCS table with Andrew James, Max Mose, and (of course) Paul Swartz. (Rumor has it that one Miss Beth Hetland might drop by, too!) Hope to see you there!

Secondly, I’ve been working my butt off lately doing a Very Special Project for a wonderful show called Story Collider. For those unfamiliar with it: shame on you! This podcast (and live show) is so good that you should be listening to it as we speak (er, write. Or read. In fact, nevermind). Story Collider features 10- to 15-minute stories about people’s experiences with science, both mad and otherwise. Erin Barker, Ben Lillie, and Brian Wecht (the show’s creators/sustainers) are awesome, and we’ve had the pleasure of working with Erin and Ben a few times in our Drawn Out Storytelling shows. They pay for Story Collider out of their own pockets, which is a sizable expense, so they’ve started a fundraiser to not only keep Story Collider going but to improve it as well. They have a lot of great incentives for donating money, aside from the standard warm fuzzy feeling of doing a nice thing. If you donate $50 or more, you’ll get an exclusive book featuring four comic adaptations of Story Collider’s greatest hits! It’s totally worth it, if I do say so myself. It has stories by David Dickerson, John Rennie, Erik Hofer, and Margot Leitman, with art by Joe Wierenga, Maki Naro, Paul Swartz, and myself, respectively. Here’s a sample of my piece:

The AIDS Cookie (adapted from Margot Leitman's story) Page 1

There are four more pages where that came from, but you can only find them in the exclusive Story Collider: Science in Comics book. Any donations you make are also tax-deductible, so why not give a little?

Speaking of comics work, I also have a piece in another anthology! I have a four-page story in Lies Grown-ups Told Me, edited by Nomi Kane, Caitlin McGurk, and Jen Vaughn. It’s called Earth Girls Are Easy, and here’s a sample page:

Earth Girls Are Easy Page 1If you’d like a copy, come see me at MIX or contact one of those fine ladies!

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This is your brain. This is your brain on no sleep.

30 Mar

Ugh…I need to stop pulling all-nighters on blog update nights, you guys. I forgot to update because I spent all of Monday and Tuesday feeling like this:

guhhhhhhhh

CCS Industry Day is tomorrow, and I was determined to go all-out. I spent most of Monday making Leftovers Are Good Luck, a collection of my short comics that’ll be replacing Eat Up, Cat in my MoCCA debut lineup, and most of Tuesday fighting to stay awake and failing.

But hey, speaking of MoCCA, we finally received our table number! Bailey Sharp, Ben Juers, Max Mose, Paul Swartz, and I will be at table M10. We’ll have Em Sauter, Ryland Ianelli, and Jesse Mead on one side, and Beth Hetland, Ben Horak, Pat Barrett, and Josh Kramer on the other. (What an awesome sandwich!) We’ll also be in the same row as many other lovely CCSers, such as CJ Joughin, Canto, Billage, Andy Warner, Melanie Gillman, Nate Wooters, Dakota McFadzean, Holly Foltz, Denis St. John, Nomi Kane, and many more! If you’re going to be there, please come say hello!

I also mentioned in my previous entry that I’ll be teaching two comics workshops in Springfield, VT this summer. Some of the details have changed since the last time I mentioned it, so here are the final details:Let's Draw Comics with Lena!

Making Comics with Lena!

Come learn all the basics of making comics! We’ll pencil, ink, and letter our own comics starring our very own characters, and at the end of the week we’ll put it all together into a finished book. No experience necessary– if you like to draw, we’d love to have you!

The first session is for students 10-12 years old and will take place July 11-15 from 9:00-11:30 am. I’m going to be covering the basic terms, materials, and methods of making your own comics, including character design, backgrounds, and lettering. Plus, we’ll doing some really fun drawing activities, and at the end of the camp I’ll put the students’ work together into anthologies for everyone to take home. I’m so excited about teaching this!

The second session is for teens and older students and will take place July 25-29 from 9:00-11:30 am. I’ll cover the same basics as in the first session, since they can be beneficial for students of all ages, but I’ll be going into more detail and doing some extra activities. I’ll also put the students’ work from this camp into its own anthology for students to take home.

If you or someone you know is interested in either camp, you can find out more on the Vault Gallery’s website or at the gallery itself at 68 Main St., Springfield, VT. :)

All right, I figure I’ve talked your ears off enough for now. I’m off to Dr. Sketchy’s to draw some clowns in corsets! It’s gonna be tons of fun, so if you’re in the WRJ area, you should definitely stop by! :)

Who doesn’t love a good hula-hooping?

21 Feb

I do, that’s for sure. I remember fondly the last time I took my hula hoop out of the garage and gave it a spin…

…okay, no, I don’t. But I do remember the last time I drew a hula hoop! Check it out:

Contemporary Vintage Sleaze sketch

This is a preliminary sketch for Vintage Sleaze, a nifty blog that specializes in 1950s “forgotten, anonymous, or neglected sexy artists” of comics, pin-ups, books, and other souvenirs designed to titillate. The blog’s co-author, Jim Linderman,  found Paul’s site a week or so ago and asked him if he’d like to contribute an illustration inspired by a vintage sleaze gag. Upon finding out that Paul attends a school full of artists, he opened up submissions to the rest of us CCSers. You guys know how much I love pin-up girls and 1950s ephemera, so it’s probably no surprise that I jumped at the chance. I kicked around a lot of ideas, including one involving an Indian woman in a sheer sari that I might revisit later, but ultimately I feel like this sketch came out the best. I ended up doing a full-color watercolor of it for the final version.

Want to see how my finished illustration turned out? Check it out here on the Vintage Sleaze site! Additional entries in the series will be posted once a week and will include work by Gary Panter, Vanessa Davis, fellow CCS students Paul Swartz, Bailey Sharp, Max Mose, and Denis St. John, and hopefully many more!

I guess winter’s really here.

6 Dec

I woke up this morning to big fat snowflakes pouring out of the sky.

coooooold

The flakes were big enough to look fake (although maybe that’s the California girl in me talking), like maybe someone was shooting a Christmas special outside. “Welcome to the land of freezing your important bits off,” they seemed to say to me. Wintertime in Vermont is a harsh mistress…but I have to admit that she’s quite the looker.

Anyway, enough waxing poetic–Bad Poetry Day isn’t for another several months! I wanted to thank you guys for all of the feedback you gave me on the update-schedule front. It’s really interesting for me to see what you guys prefer when it comes to updates and content, so please feel free to let me know what you’re thinking even if I don’t have a poll or anything.

On that note, though, I suppose I should get to the actual content of this post! Here are some more 10-minute doodles of the members of the class of 2011:

Lawrence Lee Derks III

Lawrence Derks is working on several new installments of The Grim Bard, his mini-thesis from last year about a bard who is given some of the Grim Reaper’s power to take souls. (He did, in fact, present in rhyme.)

Jon FineJon Fine is reworking and continuing Studio Lafitte, his mini-thesis from last year that focuses on the life and work of a French painter in the 1920s.

Max MoseMax Mose‘s thesis is comprised of several parts, including an animal encyclopedia, a maritime horror story, and several one-shot humor pieces.

Okay, that’s all for this week. Check back on Wednesday for the next three portraits! :)

Why can’t I stop listening to the Monsters, Inc. theme?

12 Nov

Seriously, I’d like to know.

But while you’re pondering that, here’s a visiting artist sketch:

John Brodowski

This week’s speaker was John Brodowski, creator of Curio Cabinet and elementary school teacher. John kindly invited Kevin Uehlein, Jesse Mead, Max Mose, and myself into his classroom last week, where we spent a super-fun few hours talking about CCS and doing jam comics with his 5th grade classes. John is a really nice guy, and he gave a fun lecture. His comics focus heavily on communicating a story through mood and gesture, so they feel kind of dreamy as a result–not in the “idle fantasy” way, but more in an “is this real?” way, since they often have a creepy or weird element as well. As an added bonus, he showed us several clips of amazingly bad horror films that inspired him as a kid and talked for a while about Jason Voorhees. Good times, my friend. Good times.

Speaking of good times, do you know a surefire way to have a great 2011? The only method I’ve stumbled upon so far is to pick up a Beefsteak calendar, the CCS guys’ answer to our Peep Show calendar. Beefsteak was edited by Josh Kramer and includes work by (*takes deep breath*) Rio TaylorCantoPat Barrett, Jesse Mead, Kevin Uehlein, Ben HorakCasey Bohn, Tom Casteel, Jai Granofsky, Monty MontgomeryNick Patten, Carl MefferdAndy Warner, BillageRandall Drew, Dakota McFadzeanCat Garza, Jon FineJosh Kramer, Jan Burger, Max Mose, Paul Swartz, Katie Moody, and Melanie Gillman. That’s 24 contributors in all, so you actually get 2 cartoonists per month! It’s the same deal as Peep Show: each calendar is $7 (including s&h) and contains 12 hilarious (and sassy) drawings. You can order your very own copy from just about any of the dudes listed above–I know for sure that Canto and Paul have a few to spare. If you don’t feel like you can choose between the two, you can order both calendars for a total of $10. I’ll be receiving another 1o copies of Peep Show 2011 in just a few weeks, so those will be available again soon.

Okay, that’s enough blatant advertising for one day! I’m off to doodle some stuff and poke around with some watercolors. :)

Happy Día de los Muertos!

1 Nov

I hope you all had a fun Halloween! I had a pretty good one, even though this was, sadly, the first year in a looooong time that I didn’t dress up. The Comic Boom! event was super awesome. The store itself is great–lots of selection, including a really fantastic 50-cent bin–and everyone was really friendly and fun to talk to. Corey, the owner, opened up part of the back room for us so that we could table during their normal business/Magic tournament time. Paul, Max, Canto, Bryan Stone, Denis St. John, Steve Bissette, and I were all there selling our work, and Ben came along for moral support. I finished the Día de los Muertos print I was talking about in the last post–it took me until 6:30 in the morning, but goldurnit, I finished it! I’ll post that (along with that visiting artist sketch I keep promising) on Wednesday.

On the subject of skeletons, though, I did some Día de los Muertos portraits of people on demand at the event as well. (Gee, can you tell I think it’s a really cool holiday?) They looked something like this:

Dia de los Muertos portrait

That’s skele-me in my dapper red hat, trying to convince people to spend a dollar on those portraits. I’m not sure if it came through in the scan, but the markings on the face were done in gold gel pen. Clearly, no expense was spared.

Steve and I drew each other as skeletons at the beginning of the event while things were slow, which was fun! You can see my portrait of him here, and his portrait of me just below:

Steve's Portrait

D’awww….lookit that face.

Welp, I’m about to pass out from lack of sleep and I’ve got to wake up at 5:30 in order to help teach a workshop tomorrow, so that’s it for me tonight. I’ll be back on Wednesday with lots more sketches and an exciting update on the calendar situation!

Muévete! Muévete!

29 Oct

Busy, busy busy! We’re all back to full health over here, which is great, but now we’re scrambling to get ready for Halloween festivities. That means lots of costume planning (I had a last-minute change of heart) and also illustration work for this excellent event:pew pew pew

Comic Boom is graciously hosting several CCS students tomorrow in order to let us sell our work and watch horror movies with them. I’ll be there along with Paul, Ben, and Max…but I’m a huge scaredy-cat, as I’ve mentioned before, so I’m only participating in the former. I’d still like to have something new and seasonal to bring with me, though, so I’ve been working on some Día-de-los-Muertos-inspired prints to sell. Unfortunately, that means I’ve got a lot left to do, so this blog post is going to be on the short side. Don’t worry, though–I’ll post the finished products here. In the meantime, here’s a quick visiting artist doodle I did yesterday of Laura Park:

letterin' up a storm

I’ll post my usual picture with quotes (plus a little bit about her talk and watercolor demo) on Monday, but right now I have to get back to drawin’ skeletons!

Pittsburgh? More like PIXburgh!

20 Oct

Oh, PIX, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways…

1) You give me the excuse to go an an excellent road trip with Paul, Max, and Canto! All in all, we spent a total of 24 hours driving to and from Pittsburgh. Canto and I split up the driving, but it was still quite a ways! Driving late at night is generally super-stressful for me, but I have to admit that I loved taking the early-morning shifts and getting to watch the sun rise as I drove. Also, back episodes of This American Life are totally my new favorite thing to listen to as we drive.

and that's trust

2) You let me visit my friends and family while gettin’ my comics on! My excellent grandparents have been crazy supportive of me and my comics endeavors this year, having let me live with them over the summer while I interned at the Pittsburgh ToonSeum, and on top of that they let all four of us descend upon their household this weekend. We also got to meet up with my longtime friend and partner in crime Lauren Chapman. We’re of an eerily similar breed both geographically (we were both born ‘n’ raised near Pittsburgh, went to the same high school in California, and then returned to the East Coast for grad school) and artistically (although she does graphic design and creative writing while I do comics), and it was fantastic to see her again!

or something like 'em

3) You put on a hell of a show! The inaugural Pittsburgh Indy Comics Expo was an amazing experience. The show took place on the top floor of the Guardian Storage Facility, which turned out to be a beautiful space with tons of windows, wood floors, and beautiful brick walls. There was tons of space, but we were still close enough to other artists’ tables to be able to talk with them. It was on the smaller side, what with it being the first year and all, but everyone who came was so enthusiastic and interested in seeing (and, y’know, buying!) our work. Also, Bill Boichel (of Copacetic Comics fame, who ran this con) is a stand-up guy. Our table reservation somehow got lost, but Bill was really nice about it. He was super polite, apologized several times to us, and set us up with a new table right across from Canto and Max. The con overall ran really smoothly, but his handling of the situation was so professional and nice that it made me certain I want to come back next year. (It was especially comforting in comparison to how HeroesCon treated us when the exact same thing happened to us earlier this summer–hint: not as well.)

4) You let me meet such a wide variety of awesome people! A ton of talented artists came to exhibit at the con this past weekend. Unfortunately, I didn’t get to meet all of them because I was behind a table of my own most of the time, but I did get to meet a fair amount. Here’s who we did get to see:

Dan and Kerry Tallarico found a way to combine two of my favorite things: cupcakes and comics! Dan has also inadvertently given me the excellent nickname of ChandROCK! I traded with them for their entire run of Captain Cupcake, and I am a better person for it. So far only one baby has ever thrown up in front of their booth, and that was probably because it couldn’t handle the sheer amount of awesomeness.

Kevin Czapiewski was at the table next to us with his comic Puppyteeth and promoting his webcomic Spoilers. He continually offered us helpful items–scissors, water bottles, excellent comics–throughout the con. I am worried we did not offer him enough in return. Kevin, if you’re reading this, I feel I owe you some snacks or a quest item or something!

I first met Juan Fernandez during my time at the ToonSeum this summer. He was the first person to ever recognize me based on my comics. He is always really positive and enthusiastic about comics, so it’s great to talk to him! I traded with him for his new mini, Une Petite Histoire, which I am excited about reading even though I cannot read any French. He also makes amazing cardboard displays for his work–check them out if you ever get a chance!

I don’t just like Pat Lewis because he has also drawn a yeti comic (called Abominable as well!), but it certainly helps! He was at the table behind ours and had some really excellent books for sale. I picked up a set of buttons (one of which had his yeti on it) and his Girls Gone Mild mini. Pocket-sized comics featuring pretty girls–how could I pass it up?

Joe Medwid and David Rhodenbaugh are two stand-up gentlemen who make a comic called Apartment 4-H. Joe was another of the ToonSeum’s volunteers this summer and befriended me despite my tendency to respond to Facebook messages horribly late. This weekend I traded them for their lovingly-toned Apartment 4-H: The Classics book, which promises to be highly entertaining.

Ed Piskor showed up on the first day of the con with some of the most amazing bling I’ve ever seen. I first met him during my summer at the ToonSeum, and he was crazy friendly and welcoming to me! His current comic project is Wizzywig, the first three volumes of which are available in print and the first two or three chapters of which are available for download (with new pages being added every day).

Alex Ilitchev wasn’t tabling at the con, but he came by and talked shop with us a bit. (Some of it was even in Russian–Paul always seems to find someone to speak Russian with wherever we go, and this time Alex was it! :P) He’s drawn several webcomics, the most recent of which is called Owl House and is pretty fun. (The pixel-art owl in the URL bar is pretty much the cutest thing ever.)

Wayne Wise runs Phantom of the Attic, which is an awesome comics store in Oakland. My dad used to take my sister and me there as a special treat back in the day, and now they stock some of our comics! How cool is that? Wayne himself is also an awesome guy–he co-received the very first Xeric Grant and is still making comics today.

In short, how do I love thee, PIX? A whole hell of a lot. :)

c'mere, you

Nurse! I need 100 ccs of whimsy, STAT!

8 Oct

As we get into the final days before our deadline (what we in the biz call “siege conditions”), my studio-mates and I have been daydreaming about the other jobs we could potentially hold.

Max: I wish I could just be a nightclub promoter…or maybe an avant-garde jazz musician.

Lawrence: Sometimes I think I could own a little bookshop on a boardwalk. But then I’m like, how impractical is that? Your books would be horribly damaged!

Ben: …Convict.

As for me, I’m ready to embrace any career that lets me take a break from InDesign for a while. I’ve spent the last few weeks working on this:

This is Peep Show 2011, a calendar edited by Nomi Kane and myself. It features 12 of the talented female cartoonists at CCS drawing pin-ups of each other in all our nerdy, artsy glory. They’re full-color, $7 including shipping, and tons of fun (if I do say so myself)! Email me if you’d like to reserve a copy (or copies, if you’re feeling decadent!), or come pick one up in person if you’re coming to PIX! We all worked really hard on this (my contributions included drawing the lovely Colleen Frakes and the front cover, plus designing and laying out the interior), so I highly recommend checking it out. :)

All right…it’s back to work for me, so I’ll catch you guys on Monday!

[Insert your own Baby 2.0 joke here.]

4 Oct

Just a warning: the next few updates are probably gonna be a little atypical, content-wise. My first big deadline for my thesis seminar is a week from today, and my schedule’s going to be nothing but art, food, and perhaps a little sleep until then. A few days after that, I get to hear a talk by Aaron Renier (my thesis advisor), and that night Canto, Max Mose, Paul Swartz, and I will be heading down to Pittsburgh for the Pittsburgh Indy Comics Expo (PIX for short)! Things will be back to normal(ish) in two weeks, and I’ll still be posting art in the meantime, but it’s gonna be crazy for a while so updates might only have one picture/be filled with sleep-mad gibberish. SUCH IS MY BURDEN, I SUPPOSE. :P

Anyway, here is a peek at one of the characters in the comic I have been slaving over lately:

and her robot babyHer name is Carla, and she’s holding her robot son. She looks slightly different here than she does in the comic–normally she wears her hair loose, but you can see the kid is going for it anyway, so it’s probably best that it’s pulled back. I shaded this with brush pen, which is why the grays are kind of streaky, but in general I really like the lighting in this image. I also like how Carla’s hands turned out. I know she should be supporting the baby’s head, but she’s in the middle of switching positions, and it’s made out of a resilient plastic and is probably easier for the baby to lift than a normal baby head.

Erm. Not that the baby does a lot of lifting of human heads, baby or otherwise. It’s pretty benign as far as robot overlords go.

More art (and maybe more of a sneak-peek into this story, depending on how far along I am) on Wednesday!

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